Thursday, 24 October 2013

What's (the) Matter?

  1. Scribe posts:
  2. What are some properties of gases and air? - Observations and Deductions
  3. Investigation - What’s matter?
1. Scribe Posts
A student asked the question, "What's the point of the Scribe Posts?" We looked back at the Scribe document which outlines the scribe purpose as follows:
  1. To write what you learned - both content and skills.
  2. Contribute and collaborate to make a set of class notes (textbook).  People from around the world may look at these as well!
  3. Take an opportunity to learn and to practice writing useful notes supported by media (images, video and other) .
    1. Sometimes we just do things in class without taking the time to think about what we learned.  When you think about what you did and what you learned from what you did, and write down what you learned, you will be much more likely to remember what you learned.
    2. Taking notes is a skill you will need for high-school and university.
  4. Students that miss class can have a quick summary of what they missed.
  5. It’s more efficient to have a set of class notes.  Instead of having to take notes every class, hopefully, you can depend on your peers to take quality notes for you.  

Block 2 Comments
  • Those of you who got lower marks wrote what we did rather than what content and skills we learned.  
  • Photos: your wide framed shots were pretty, however they often did not support the content or skills.
  • In the future, take photos closer so you can see measurements, text, what’s on the screen.

Phase 2: is the second set round of scribe posts. Now, we will also:
    • Have at least two hyperlinks
      • a part of the Science 7 blog
      • an outside page that has content/skills connected to the lesson
    • Start giving feedback on other scribe posts:
      • You give feedback to the person that went before you!
      • This feedback will be used by the person to improve their scribe post.

       Here is a link to the Phase 2 Scribe Rubric.



  • The universe is divided into matter and energy.
  • Matter is divided into fluids and solids.
  • Fluids are divided into liquids and gases.
  • Fluids have certain properties.
Demo - oil, freshwater (coloured green) and saltwater (coloured blue) were put in the same test-tube.

The oil floated on water because it's less dense.  The saltwater (blue) tended to sink because it was the most dense, and the freshwater was in the middle layer.

  • We looked at the 6 experiments from the prior class that demonstrated fluids have certain properties:

Predictions & Method

Experiment 1
  • Read the method and predict what will happen to the jar-water system after the last step.
Method 1
  1. Submerge the jar in the container of water until the jar is full of water.
  2. Rotate the jar so its mouth is facing down.
  3. Slowly lift the jar until its mouth is just below the surface of the water.


Observations
  • the water stays in the container


Deductions Summary
  • Air pressure pushes on the water in the container, so that the water does not fall down.
Experiment 2
  • Read the method and predict what will happen to the jar-water system after the last step.
Method 2
  1. Put the jar in the water with the length horizontal until half of it is full of water.
  2. Rotate the jar so its mouth faces down and its length is vertical.
  3. Submerge another jar and fill it with water and turn it so its mouth is facing down.
  4. Pour the air from the first jar into the second jar by holding the mouth of the second jar above the first jar.  Tilt the first jar so that the air escapes and bubbles up into the second jar.


Observations
  • air from one container displaces the water in the other container


Deductions Summary
air can displace water; displace means it pushes it out.



Method 3
  1. Inflate one of the balloons to a diameter of about 10 cm.  Deflate it.  Do not tie it!
  2. Practice putting the mouth of the balloon over the mouth of the flask.  
  3. Put about 3 scoops of baking soda into the balloon.
  4. Measure 10mL of vinegar using the measuring cyclinder.
  5. Pour the 10mL of vinegar into an Erlenmeyer flask.
  6. Put the balloon over the mouth of the flask.  Empty the baking soda from the balloon into the flask.
  7. Wait and let the balloon fill up with gas.  Shake the flask gently to complete the reaction faster.
  8. Remove the balloon and tie a knot in it.


Observations
  • bubbles were produced gas was produced → indicates a chemical reaction
  • balloon moved and it inflated
Deductions Summary
  • chemical reactions can change matter’s state (liquid reacting with a solid produced a gas (and a liquid))
  • gas can be used to change the shape and move objects

Experiment 3 & 4
Prediction
Read the method and predict how the gases in the balloon may be different.


Method 4
  1. Inflate a balloon to about the same size as the balloon in Method 2.
  2. Tie a knot in the balloon.
  3. Compare the gas in the first balloon to the second balloon, and write down your observations.


Observations
  • baking soda and vinegar balloon fell faster than the air filled balloon (→ indicates that it was heavier)


Deductions Summary
  • different kinds of gases with different properties:
    • carbon dioxide (CO2)
    • helium (He)
    • hydrogen (H2)
    • Nitrogen (N2) ~80 % of atmosphere
    • Oxygen (O2) ~20 % of atmosphere
    • Methane (CH4)
    • carbon monoxide (CO)
Experiment 5
Predict what will happen with the balloon-hand-water-tank system.


Method 5
  1. Get a big balloon from Mr. Pro.
  2. Inflate the balloon to a size that’s a little wider than the mouth of the jar.
  3. Submerge the balloon into the water and write down your observations.


Observations
  • the balloon pushes up on your hand
  • water level in the container rises
Deductions Summary
  • objects that are less __dense___ will rise in fluids than more ____dense___
  • fluids become displaced when things are put in them.
  • the fluid that is displaced pushes up on objects that are displacing it
Experiment 6
Explain what happened to the balloon.


Method 6
  1. Crumple up half a piece of paper.
  2. Light the paper on fire from the bottom and place it in the jar.
  3. Put the balloon on top of the jar so the mouth is sealed.
  4. Wait until the flame goes out.
  5. Grab and gently pick up the balloon.


Observations
  • balloon went in to the jar, (and then it popped)
  • The jar became warmer
Deductions Summary
  • temperature: the burning increased the temperature in the jar
  • density: when air heats up, it rises because it becomes less dense
  • pressure: when there’s less dense air in the jar, there’s less pressure.  The air outside the jar has more pressure.  The high pressure air flows to low pressure inside the jar.  The balloon is between the airs so the air pushes the balloon into the jar.


Summary: All the above concepts are connected to matter:
  • Fluids take the shape of what they are in.  Fluids flow.  Water and air are both fluids.  
  • Fluids exert pressure on objects in them.  Air pressure pushes on everything in the atmosphere.
  • Fluids will move from places of high pressure to places of low pressure.
  • Air can displace water.  Displace means take the place of.  
  • Matter has a variety of properties.  There are different kinds of gases, each with similar and different properties.
  • Density is mass divided by volume (density = massvolume).
  • Objects that are less dense than the fluids they are in will rise.
  • If the temperature of a gas increases in an open container, the gas will becomes less dense and rise.


 First, predictions were made as to the volume and mass of different objects. For example, the mass of the magnet was predicted:
To estimate the mass, the magnet was moved up and down in her hand.
The predicted mass was recorded here.


videoPick up and hold the objects to estimate or predict their mass





video
Video 2: Measure the volume of marbles.
Record the initial volume _______.
Record the final volume _______.
The total volume of the marbles = final - initial volume.
What's your answer?  Check the bottom for the correct answer.


video
Video 3: Record the quantitative observations in a table.


video
Video 4: Measure the mass of marbles.
What's the mass?  ______
Calculate the density = mass/volume
Check the bottom for the correct answer.




 Quantitative data:
What's the density?  See the next video for the answer


video
Video 5: Calculation of density

Answer Key
Video 2: Measure the volume of marbles.
Record the initial volume ____61 mL___.
Record the final volume ___65 mL___.
The total volume of the marbles = final - initial volume = 65 - 61 = 4 mL

Video 4: Measure the mass of marbles.
What's the mass?  ___11.0g_____
Calculate the density = mass/volume = 11.0g/4.0mL = 2.8 g/mL
Check the bottom for the correct answer.
___________________________________________________________________________
Draft Post
  1. Scribe posts:
  2. What are some properties of gases and air? - Observations and Deductions
  3. Investigation - What’s matter?
1. Scribe Posts
A student asked the question, "What's the point of the Scribe Posts?" We looked back at the Scribe document which outlines the scribe purpose as follows:
  1. To write what you learned - both content and skills.
  2. Contribute and collaborate to make a set of class notes (textbook).  People from around the world may look at these as well!
  3. Take an opportunity to learn and to practice writing useful notes supported by media (images, video and other) .
    1. Sometimes we just do things in class without taking the time to think about what we learned.  When you think about what you did and what you learned from what you did, and write down what you learned, you will be much more likely to remember what you learned.
    2. Taking notes is a skill you will need for high-school and university.
  4. Students that miss class can have a quick summary of what they missed.
  5. It’s more efficient to have a set of class notes.  Instead of having to take notes every class, hopefully, you can depend on your peers to take quality notes for you.  

Block 2 Comments
  • Those of you who got lower marks wrote what we did rather than what content and skills we learned.  
  • Photos: your wide framed shots were pretty, however they often did not support the content or skills.
  • In the future, take photos closer so you can see measurements, text, what’s on the screen.

Phase 2: is the second set round of scribe posts. Now, we will also:

    • Have at least two hyperlinks
      • a part of the Science 7 blog
      • an outside page that has content/skills connected to the lesson
    • Start giving feedback on other scribe posts:
      • You give feedback to the person that went before you!
      • This feedback will be used by the person to improve their scribe post.

       Here is a link to the Phase 2 Scribe Rubric.



  • The universe is divided into matter and energy.
  • Matter is divided into fluids and solids.
  • Fluids are divided into liquids and gases.
  • Fluids have certain properties.
Demo - oil, freshwater (coloured green) and saltwater (coloured blue) were put in the same test-tube.

The oil floated on water because it's less dense.  The saltwater (blue) tended to sink because it was the most dense, and the freshwater was in the middle layer.

  • We looked at the 6 experiments from the prior class that demonstrated fluids have certain properties:

Predictions & Method

Experiment 1
  • Read the method and predict what will happen to the jar-water system after the last step.
Method 1
  1. Submerge the jar in the container of water until the jar is full of water.
  2. Rotate the jar so its mouth is facing down.
  3. Slowly lift the jar until its mouth is just below the surface of the water.


Observations
  • the water stays in the container


Deductions Summary
  • Air pressure pushes on the water in the container, so that the water does not fall down.
Experiment 2
  • Read the method and predict what will happen to the jar-water system after the last step.
Method 2
  1. Put the jar in the water with the length horizontal until half of it is full of water.
  2. Rotate the jar so its mouth faces down and its length is vertical.
  3. Submerge another jar and fill it with water and turn it so its mouth is facing down.
  4. Pour the air from the first jar into the second jar by holding the mouth of the second jar above the first jar.  Tilt the first jar so that the air escapes and bubbles up into the second jar.


Observations
  • air from one container displaces the water in the other container


Deductions Summary
air can displace water; displace means it pushes it out.



Method 3
  1. Inflate one of the balloons to a diameter of about 10 cm.  Deflate it.  Do not tie it!
  2. Practice putting the mouth of the balloon over the mouth of the flask.  
  3. Put about 3 scoops of baking soda into the balloon.
  4. Measure 10mL of vinegar using the measuring cyclinder.
  5. Pour the 10mL of vinegar into an Erlenmeyer flask.
  6. Put the balloon over the mouth of the flask.  Empty the baking soda from the balloon into the flask.
  7. Wait and let the balloon fill up with gas.  Shake the flask gently to complete the reaction faster.
  8. Remove the balloon and tie a knot in it.


Observations
  • bubbles were produced gas was produced → indicates a chemical reaction
  • balloon moved and it inflated
Deductions Summary
  • chemical reactions can change matter’s state (liquid reacting with a solid produced a gas (and a liquid))
  • gas can be used to change the shape and move objects

Experiment 3 & 4
Prediction
Read the method and predict how the gases in the balloon may be different.


Method 4
  1. Inflate a balloon to about the same size as the balloon in Method 2.
  2. Tie a knot in the balloon.
  3. Compare the gas in the first balloon to the second balloon, and write down your observations.


Observations
  • baking soda and vinegar balloon fell faster than the air filled balloon (→ indicates that it was heavier)


Deductions Summary
  • different kinds of gases with different properties:
    • carbon dioxide (CO2)
    • helium (He)
    • hydrogen (H2)
    • Nitrogen (N2) ~80 % of atmosphere
    • Oxygen (O2) ~20 % of atmosphere
    • Methane (CH4)
    • carbon monoxide (CO)
Experiment 5
Predict what will happen with the balloon-hand-water-tank system.


Method 5
  1. Get a big balloon from Mr. Pro.
  2. Inflate the balloon to a size that’s a little wider than the mouth of the jar.
  3. Submerge the balloon into the water and write down your observations.


Observations
  • the balloon pushes up on your hand
  • water level in the container rises
Deductions Summary
  • objects that are less __dense___ will rise in fluids than more ____dense___
  • fluids become displaced when things are put in them.
  • the fluid that is displaced pushes up on objects that are displacing it
Experiment 6
Explain what happened to the balloon.


Method 6
  1. Crumple up half a piece of paper.
  2. Light the paper on fire from the bottom and place it in the jar.
  3. Put the balloon on top of the jar so the mouth is sealed.
  4. Wait until the flame goes out.
  5. Grab and gently pick up the balloon.


Observations
  • balloon went in to the jar, (and then it popped)
  • The jar became warmer
Deductions Summary
  • temperature: the burning increased the temperature in the jar
  • density: when air heats up, it rises because it becomes less dense
  • pressure: when there’s less dense air in the jar, there’s less pressure.  The air outside the jar has more pressure.  The high pressure air flows to low pressure inside the jar.  The balloon is between the airs so the air pushes the balloon into the jar.


Summary: All the above concepts are connected to matter:
  • Fluids take the shape of what they are in.  Fluids flow.  Water and air are both fluids.  
  • Fluids exert pressure on objects in them.  Air pressure pushes on everything in the atmosphere.
  • Fluids will move from places of high pressure to places of low pressure.
  • Air can displace water.  Displace means take the place of.  
  • Matter has a variety of properties.  There are different kinds of gases, each with similar and different properties.
  • Density is mass divided by volume (density = massvolume).
  • Objects that are less dense than the fluids they are in will rise.
  • If the temperature of a gas increases in an open container, the gas will becomes less dense and rise.

 3. Investigation - What’s matter?


 First, predictions were made as to the volume and mass of different objects. For example, the mass of the magnet was predicted:
To estimate the mass, the magnet was moved up and down in her hand.
The predicted mass was recorded here.


videoPick up and hold the objects to estimate or predict their mass





video













3 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Remember to write constructive feedback to help the scribe improve the summary of content and skills. How can I show the skills?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Mr. Pro, you forgot to show one of the skills, which was to use the electronic scale and use the button TARE. You could show this skill by showing a student doing this part of the experiment. Also, you didn't show any skills in the first video, you could show the results of the experiment. In addition, you could show all data in the picture of the notebook. Overall, I think you did a good post.

    ReplyDelete

Please write positive comments or constructive feedback in full sentences.